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University of Tehran , h.minoonejad@ut.ac.ir
Abstract:   (1435 Views)
Purpose: Volleyball has a high potential for shoulder dyskinesia due to the repetitive nature of spike, serve and block, so the aim was to investigate electromyography analysis of shoulder girdle muscle in male volleyball players with different types of scapular dyskinesia while performing a floater serve.
Methods: The current research method is the causal-comparative type. 41 volleyball players aged 18-25 were selected non-randomly and purposefully and were divided into three groups (n=13 inferior angle of scapula prominence, n=13 medial border of scapula prominence, n=13 without scapulae dyskinesia). Electromyography of 4 muscles including serratus anterior, upper, middle, and lower trapezius in the dominant shoulder was evaluated while performing a floater serve using MyoMuscle. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance test at the significance level of 0.05.
Results:  The results showed that during the acceleration phase of the serving, there was a significant difference in EMG of the upper trapezius (p=0.009) and middle trapezius (p=0.01) between the medial border of scapula prominence group and without dyskinesia group, and there was a significant difference in EMG of serratus anterior (p=0.007) and middle trapezius (p=0.01) between the inferior angle of scapula prominence group and without dyskinesia group.
Conclusion: It seems that during the acceleration phase of the floater serve, volleyball players with medial border of scapula prominence experienced an abnormal increase in upper trapezius activity and inhibition of the middle trapezius activity, while probably volleyball players with inferior angle of scapula prominence experience inhibition the activity of the middle trapezius and serratus anterior.
     
Type of Study: Research | Subject: آسیب شناسی و حرکات اصلاحی
Received: 2023/05/10 | Accepted: 2023/08/23

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