Volume 18, Issue 19 (7-2020)                   RSMT 2020, 18(19): 11-21 | Back to browse issues page


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, davoudzabihi@yahoo.com
Abstract:   (3252 Views)
The purpos of this study was to determine the effect of  twelve session of high intensity cycle training with blood flow restriction on aerobic and anaerobic performance of active student men. To this purpose, 24 valentear active students men from physical eduction faculty of kharazmi university aged 19-23 years old, students (mean ± SD weight: 67.89±6 kg, height: 173.92±5.41cm, and  BMI: 22.7±6.84kg/m2) divided into three groups of blood flow restriction (BFR) (n=8), none blood flow restriction(NBFR) (n=8) and control group (n=8). The exercise consisted of cycling at 80% Wmax for ten 1-min bouts, with a 2-min rest between bouts with 50% Wmax (total time, 30 min). Before and after implementation of the training protocol, Astrand Test to check the aerobic  performance and Wingate test to check anaerobic performance was conducted. To data analysis, the independent t-test, analysis of variance test and post hoc test (LSD) was used. Results indicated that two weeks of high intensity cycling with and without blood flow restriction does have a significant impact on VO2max(p=0.000) and Wmax(p=0.000) and time to exhaustion (p=0.001). The results indicate a further increase in aerobic performance components, in exercise with blood flow restriction training group compared to the unrestricted blood flow training group. The results olso indicated that tow weeks of cycle training with occlusion does not have a significant impact on peak anaerobic power(p=0.064), average anaerobic power(p=0.058) and minimum anaerobic power(p=0.826). In general, the results showed a partial restriction of blood during cycling interval training have affect on aerobic adaptations, but  does not affect on anaerobic adaptations.
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Type of Study: Research |
Received: 2021/01/5 | Accepted: 2020/07/15 | Published: 2020/07/15

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