Volume 2, Issue 1 (4-2015)                   Human Information Interaction 2015, 2(1): 50-58 | Back to browse issues page

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Navidi F. The Role of Online Social Networks in Users' Everyday-Life Information Seeking. Human Information Interaction 2015; 2 (1)
URL: http://hii.khu.ac.ir/article-1-2466-en.html
Abstract:   (7892 Views)

Background and Aim: Considering the increasing number of users who interact with online social networks, it can be inferred that these networks have become an essential part of users' lives and play different roles in their everyday life. Therefore, the present study aims to explore the role of these networks in users' everyday-life information seeking.

Method: This research is an applied research with qualitative approach and it was conducted using thematic analysis method. This method includes a semi - structured interview with active users of online social networks.

Results: Results indicate that online social networks play different roles in the users' lives, such as entertainment, education, communication and interactions; accompanied by, news, favorite contents, and up-to-date information; but, these networks face some challenges that affect information seeking behavior of users which compels users to utilize active information seeking.

Conclusion: Richer social capital and diversity of users in an individual's social network leads to the access to more qualitative information which in turn increases the probability of finding the required information and achieving the expected results with the least effort.

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Type of Study: Research | Subject: Special

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