Volume 10, Issue 4 (3-2024)                   Human Information Interaction 2024, 10(4): 1-20 | Back to browse issues page

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Morovati M, Riahinia N, Azimi A. The Open Access Movement in the Covid-19 Pandemic Crisis: The World Community’s Efforts. Human Information Interaction 2024; 10 (4)
URL: http://hii.khu.ac.ir/article-1-3121-en.html
Kharazmi University
Abstract:   (1548 Views)
Background and Aim: The Covid-19 pandemic crisis has highlighted the importance of open and timely access to scientific information. The aim of this study was to explain the world community's efforts to open access in the Covid-19 pandemic crisis.
Method: This was a review study in terms of approach using documentary research method. In this regard, open access literature was studied using searches on Google search engine, Google Scholar and databases such as PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus and the websites of publishers, journals and scientific institutions, focusing on the Covid-19 pandemic crisis.
Results: Since the formation of the open access movement, this issue has attracted a lot of attention and extensive efforts have been made in the direction of open access to research publications by the scientific community. Publishers, financial sponsors and international institutions have also entered this arena and various statements and plans have been formed in order to recognize the open access movement and its development. “Budapest Open Access Initiative”, “Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing”, “Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities” are the first measures in this regard. On the other hand, the importance of access to timely information, especially in the fields of medical sciences and information related to health and diseases, is worthy of attention in promoting public health. The need to pay attention to open access and sharing of information and the consequences of not doing so has become more important with the occurrence of critical and emergency situations caused by pandemic and public health emergencies. Along with the emergence of COVID-19 and the pandemic caused by it, many researches have been conducted in order to deal with the crisis of this disease and to find solutions for its treatment and control. The aspects of this deadly disease have attracted the attention of everyone, especially scientists and scholars in various fields around the world, and an unprecedented number of articles have been published in this field. In addition, many international organizations have published various information about the disease of COVID-19 in the form of open access, for example, “WHO Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Dashboard” and "Coronavirus Watch". The unprecedented crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of information transparency and timely and open access to it. Access to accurate and timely information about this emerging disease is very important and can help to assess and understand the risks and obtain strategies to contain it, strong evidence, better information and support for decisions and policies in the direction of public health. The need to provide suitable solutions for treatment, prevention and control of the disease on the one hand and the increasing number of researches on COVID-19 on the other hand, has created new opportunities in the system of scientific communication and publication of research findings, and the scientific community has decided to accelerate the cycle of knowledge to find possible solutions to deal with the disease crisis. Explaining the efforts and measures taken in this direction during the COVID-19 pandemic as the most important global crisis and concern can provide useful information to the scientific community, especially those involved in research. Considering the unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, as well as the importance of timely and open access to scientific information about this disease, the question arises as to what measures have been taken in response to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis? Also, what measures and measures have been taken for free access to scientific information about the pandemic? A review of the literature regarding the issue of open access in the crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic showed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, a global effort has been made to facilitate open access to COVID-19 research findings. The need for appropriate strategies for the treatment, prevention and control of the disease and the increasing number of COVID-19 research has affected the system of scientific communication and the publication of research findings and the world community, especially reputable publishers and scientific institutions, have made extensive statements, measures and efforts to provide open access to as much scientific information as possible about the disease. During the crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic, many publishers, journals and funders have committed to open access in a statement to ensure that research findings and data relevant to this outbreak are shared rapidly and openly to inform the public health response and help save lives. The measures and actions of publishers and scientific journals in this regard are worthy of attention. Access to Elsevier's free medical and health research related to COVID-19 is possible through the "Elsevier's Novel Coronavirus Information Center". Elsevier has also created a collection of free resources, including evidence-based clinical guidelines and more than 41,000 research articles to read, download and extract data, in support of the research communities' impressive efforts in the fight against COVID-19. This guide provides an overview of the resources. Through the "COVID-19 Resource Centre", Lancet has provided free access to all research articles, review articles, news and analysis related to COVID-19 from its journals. Springer Nature has provided free access to the latest COVID-19 articles through the "Coronavirus (COVID-19) Research Highlights". The publisher has now enabled free access to articles, book chapters, reference works and protocols on its platforms and has supported all researchers to make their experimental datasets freely available. Springer Nature has made more than 8,700 preprint articles on COVID-19 available through “Research Square”, with links to key resources, free content, and up-to-date information related to COVID-19, along with key information and policies in support of access from placed far away. NEJM has made available a collection of articles and resources such as clinical reports and management guides about the pandemic, as well as a collection of resources about the COVID-19 vaccines. BMJ's Coronavirus (COVID-19) Hub has also supported health professionals and researchers through open access to practical guides, online courses, as well as the latest BMG news, opinions and research. PLOS is committed to publishing research as quickly as possible, especially in public health emergencies. All articles published in PLOS journals are free for all readers. PLOS articles collection highlights all the content related to the COVID-19 pandemic published in PLOS journals. To support the efforts of global health professionals and the scientific research community, Taylor & Francis has created a special collection of research articles related to COVID-19, providing free access to published articles related to COVID-19 in the publisher's major medical journals. he does. This collection is updated weekly. On the other hand, the archive of all research articles related to COVID-19 published in 2020 by Taylor & Francis has also been made available to the audience. Wiley has created the "COVID-19 Resources" in order to help researchers, educators and specialists for online training and access to the latest research on COVID-19. Believing in the power of social and behavioral sciences to transform the best medical research into policies and procedures for development, SAGE has published a collection of the latest medical research related to COVID-19 published by this publisher, as well as the best social and behavioral research in order to help It has enabled individuals, communities and guardians to make the best decisions to deal with the pandemic and its consequences. Science journals are trying to make research related to COVID-19 available in open access. The "COVID-19" option is placed on the main page of the Science website. CABI has also created free access to more than 37,000 records related to COVID-19 in its online platforms, Global Health and CAB Abstracts in order to support global efforts to deal with the disease pandemic. Global Health provides researchers and students with unparalleled access to all public health research and practices in the world - providing knowledge without borders. “Sci-Dev.Net” also includes episodes about the coronavirus in the Health, Science and Development series. Wolters Kluwer is also one of the publishers that has provided free access to publications related to COVID-19 in order to support professionals. According to IFLA reports, the actions of publishers such as Penguin Random House and Macmillan, as well as the measures of Audible and ENSSIB in terms of access to resources, are worthy of attention. Some libraries, such as the National Library and Archives of Iran, have provided extensive access to their users. Some associations and scientific societies, such as the International Coalition of Library Consortia, LIBER and the Association of University Library Directors in France, have asked publishers to facilitate access to works. Italian and Spanish librarians have called for more open access efforts. During the crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic, open access has also attracted the attention of scientific institutions, and extensive measures have been taken in this direction by them. In the January 30 statement, the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board called for immediate measures such as the free and immediate sharing of all information about the pandemic, the cooperation of countries to immediately allocate resources to prevent, identify and inform about the pandemic and the rapid sharing of research data by the research community, support Low-income countries are advised to ensure proper notification to national and international communities to control the pandemic. On January 30, 2020, following the recommendations of the Emergency Committee, the Director-General of the World Health Organization declared the disease pandemic a public health emergency of international concern. The world's scientists gathered on February 11-12, 2020 at the headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva to assess the current level of knowledge about the new virus and about critical questions and find solutions to contribute to accelerating and funding research priorities and solving the pandemic crisis and preparedness Discuss and negotiate for future issues. This meeting led to an agreement on two basic goals. The first case was to accelerate innovative research to help curb the pandemic and facilitate care, and the second case was to support research priorities that contribute to global research platforms. The World Health Organization believes that the coherence of countries is necessary to ensure fair access to the effects of COVID-19. The World Health Organization is collecting global research on the disease COVID-19 and the latest findings and international multilingual scientific information on the pandemic. UNESCO has also emphasized the value and necessity of open solutions in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and believes that open access to scientific information can facilitate better and faster research in the direction of a suitable vaccine, and open Educational Resources help everyone to use their information. updates about COVID-19 and also teaches how to follow public health recommendations. Relying on its mission to ensure global access to information, UNESCO has taken various initiatives to apply open solutions in the fight against the pandemic. For example, the Coronavirus Watch provides a global view of the pandemic situation. The COVID-19 Universal REsource gateway (CURE) is also an immediate response to the pandemic. IFLA has made efforts to encourage the World Intellectual Property Organization to emphasize how balanced intellectual property laws can help facilitate access. IFLA has also provided a list of key resources for libraries in response to the COVID-19 pandemic on its website. Open access is also emphasized in the statement of the President and Secretary General of IFLA. Following the COVID-19 crisis, priorities have also been considered in the SPARC program. Also, the Copyright Clearance Center recognizes publishing and information institutions to participate in the public interest through access to scientific, news and educational materials related to COVID-19. The list of institutions is regularly updated. The Islamic World Science and Technology Monitoring and Citation Institute has also launched the "COVID-19 Visualizer" in order to provide up-to-date statistics about the pandemic situation and accelerate the transmission of scientific findings about COVID-19. In addition, government officials have also called for open access to the publications of COVID-19. The National Science and Technology Advisors of the United States of America, Canada, England, Australia, Brazil, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, India, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and the European Commission have published an open letter asking scientific publishers to Pandemic, make publications related to COVID-19 available with open access through PubMed Central and other public databases such as the World Health Organization's COVID-19 database. The world community’s efforts demonstrate the growing importance of open access and increasing attention to this issue. It seems that the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis could provide lessons for better preparedness for possible future crises. The present study is one of the first studies conducted in our country regarding the free access movement in the pandemic crisis and tried to present a picture of the efforts of the scientific community in this field in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It is obvious that future researches on the wide dimensions and angles of this issue can cause the scientific community to become more aware of the importance of free access, especially in crises.
Conclusion: The world community’s efforts demonstrate the growing importance of open access and increasing attention to this issue. It seems that the global response to the Covid-19 pandemic crisis could provide lessons for better preparedness for possible future crises. If open access is considered as a value in the system of publishing and research communications, the development and generalization of this value requires the adoption of policies and requirements of the scientific community in order to develop it as a global value.
 
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References
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31. Abdullah, F., Ward, R., & Ahmed, E. (2016). Investigating the influence of the most commonly used external variables of TAM on students' Perceived Ease of Use (PEOU) and Perceived Usefulness (PU) of e-portfolios. Computers in human behavior, 63, 75-90. [DOI:10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.014]
32. Aburub, F., & Alnawas, I. (2019). A new integrated model to explore factors that influence adoption of mobile learning in higher education: An empirical investigation. Education and Information Technologies, 24(3), 2145-2158. [DOI:10.1007/s10639-019-09862-x]
33. Adel Ali, R., & Rafie Mohd Arshad, M. (2018). Empirical analysis on factors impacting on intention to use m-learning in basic education in Egypt. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 19(2). [DOI:10.19173/irrodl.v19i2.3510]
34. Alalwan, A. A., Dwivedi, Y. K., Rana, N. P., & Algharabat, R. (2018). Examining factors influencing Jordanian customers' intentions and adoption of internet banking: Extending UTAUT2 with risk. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 40, 125-138. [DOI:10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.08.026]
35. Al-Emran, M., Elsherif, H. M., & Shaalan, K. (2016). Investigating attitudes towards the use of mobile learning in higher education. Computers in Human behavior, 56, 93-102. [DOI:10.1016/j.chb.2015.11.033]
36. Almaiah, M. A., Alamri, M. M., & Al-Rahmi, W. (2019). Applying the UTAUT model to explain the students' acceptance of mobile learning system in higher education. IEEE Access, 7, 174673-174686. [DOI:10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2957206]
37. Arokiasamy, A. R. A. (2017). A qualitative study on the impact of mobile technology among students in private higher education institutions (PHEIs) in Peninsular Malaysia. Journal of Entrepreneurship and Business, 5(2). [DOI:10.17687/JEB.0502.03]
38. Briz-Ponce, L., Pereira, A., Carvalho, L., Juanes-Méndez, J. A., & García-Peñalvo, F. J. (2017). Learning with mobile technologies-Students' behavior. Computers in human behavior, 72, 612-620. [DOI:10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.027]
39. Cheon, J., Lee, S., Crooks, S. M., & Song, J. (2012). An investigation of mobile learning readiness in higher education based on the theory of planned behavior. Computers & education, 59(3), 1054-1064. [DOI:10.1016/j.compedu.2012.04.015]
40. Crompton, H., & Burke, D. (2018). The use of mobile learning in higher education: A systematic review. Computers & Education, 123, 53-64. [DOI:10.1016/j.compedu.2018.04.007]
41. Dassa, L., & Vaughan, M. (2018). # Class again? How education faculty engage the disengaged college student. The Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas, 91(1), 42-45. [DOI:10.1080/00098655.2017.1342434]
42. Gómez-Ramirez, I., Valencia-Arias, A., & Duque, L. (2019). Approach to M-learning acceptance among university students: An integrated model of TPB and TAM. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 20(3). [DOI:10.19173/irrodl.v20i4.4061]
43. Güler, Ç. (2017). Use of WhatsApp in higher education: What's up with assessing peers anonymously?. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 55(2), 272-289. [DOI:10.1177/0735633116667359]
44. Hameed, F., & Qayyum, A. (2018). Determinants of behavioral intention towards mobile learning in Pakistan: Mediating role of attitude. Business and Economic Review, 10(1), 33-61. [DOI:10.22547/BER/10.1.2]
45. Hoque, R., & Sorwar, G. (2017). Understanding factors influencing the adoption of mHealth by the elderly: An extension of the UTAUT model. International journal of medical informatics, 101, 75-84. [DOI:10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2017.02.002] [PMID]
46. Kim, J., Eys, M., Robertson-Wilson, J., Dunn, E., & Rellinger, K. (2019). Subjective norms matter for physical activity intentions more than previously thought: Reconsidering measurement and analytical approaches. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 43, 359-367. [DOI:10.1016/j.psychsport.2019.04.013]
47. Koksal, M. H. (2016). The intentions of Lebanese consumers to adopt mobile banking. International Journal of bank marketing. [DOI:10.1108/IJBM-03-2015-0025]
48. Kumar, J. A., Bervell, B., Annamalai, N., & Osman, S. (2020). Behavioral intention to use mobile learning: Evaluating the role of self-efficacy, subjective norm, and WhatsApp use habit. IEEE Access, 8, 208058-208074. [DOI:10.1109/ACCESS.2020.3037925]
49. Naveed, Q. N., Alam, M. M., & Tairan, N. (2020). Structural equation modeling for mobile learning acceptance by university students: An empirical study. Sustainability, 12(20), 8618. [DOI:10.3390/su12208618]
50. Nikou, S. A., & Economides, A. A. (2017). Mobile-based assessment: Investigating the factors that influence behavioral intention to use. Computers & Education, 109, 56-73. [DOI:10.1016/j.compedu.2017.02.005]
51. O'Dea, S. (2020). Number of smartphone users worldwide from 2016 to 2021. Statista Research Department.
52. Peciuliauskiene, P., Tamoliune, G., & Trepule, E. (2022). Exploring the roles of information search and information evaluation literacy and pre-service teachers' ICT self-efficacy in teaching. International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education, 19(1), 1-19. [DOI:10.1186/s41239-022-00339-5] [PMID] []
53. Peteranetz, M. S., Flanigan, A. E., Shell, D. F., & Soh, L. K. (2018). Career aspirations, perceived instrumentality, and achievement in undergraduate computer science courses. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 53, 27-44. [DOI:10.1016/j.cedpsych.2018.01.006]
54. Quan, L., Al-Ansi, A., & Han, H. (2022). Assessing customer financial risk perception and attitude in the hotel industry: Exploring the role of protective measures against COVID-19. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 101, 103123. [DOI:10.1016/j.ijhm.2021.103123] [PMID] []
55. Shamsuddin, A., Wahab, E., Abdullah, N. H., & Suratkon, A. (2018, November). Mobile learning adoption in enhancing learning experience among HEI students. In 2018 IEEE 10th International Conference on Engineering Education (ICEED) (pp. 202-207). IEEE. [DOI:10.1109/ICEED.2018.8626923]
56. Siripipatthanakul, S., Siripipattanakul, S., Limna, P., & Pholphong, L. (2022). Predicting Intention to Choose the Online Degree During the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Mediating Role of Perceived Effectiveness. Asia-Pacific Review of Research in Education, 1(1), 1-19. [DOI:10.2139/ssrn.4046240]
57. Tahar, A., Riyadh, H. A., Sofyani, H., & Purnomo, W. E. (2020). Perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, perceived security and intention to use e-filing: The role of technology readiness. The Journal of Asian Finance, Economics and Business, 7(9), 537-547. [DOI:10.13106/jafeb.2020.vol7.no9.537]
58. Uther, M. (2019). Mobile learning-trends and practices. Education Sciences, 9(1), 33. [DOI:10.3390/educsci9010033]
59. Yeap, J. A., Ramayah, T., & Soto-Acosta, P. (2016). Factors propelling the adoption of m-learning among students in higher education. Electronic Markets, 26(4), 323-338. [DOI:10.1007/s12525-015-0214-x------]

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